Psychological Stress & Cancer! - Dr Vijay Anand Reddy
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Psychological Stress & Cancer!

11:38 19 September in Uncategorized

There are several times people wonder if their attitude—positive or negative—determine their risk of,or likely recovery from, cancer? Before we answer this question, let’s study the relationship between the two.

Can psychological stress cause cancer?

Although stress can cause a number of physical health problems, the evidence that it can cause cancer is weak. Some studies have indicated a link between various psychological factors and an increased risk of developing cancer, but others have not.

Apparent links between psychological stress and cancer could arise in several indirect ways. For example, people under stress may develop certain behaviors, such as smoking, overeating, or drinking alcohol, which increase a person’s risk for cancer.

How does psychological stress affect people who have cancer?

People who have cancer may find the physical, emotional, and social effects of the disease to be stressful. Those who attempt to manage their stress with risky behaviors such as smoking or drinking alcohol or who become more sedentary may have a poorer quality of life after cancer treatment. In contrast, people who are able to use effective coping strategies to deal with stress, such as relaxation and stress management techniques, have been shown to have lower levels of depression, anxiety, and symptoms related to the cancer and its treatment. However, there is no evidence that successful management of psychological stress improves cancer survival.

How can people who have cancer learn to cope with psychological stress?

Emotional and social support can help patients learn to cope with psychological stress. Such support can reduce levels of depression, anxiety, and disease- and treatment-related symptoms among patients.

Approaches can include the following:

  • Training in relaxation, meditation, or stress management
  •  Counseling or talk therapy
  •  Cancer education sessions
  •  Social support in a group setting
  •  Medications for depression or anxiety
  •  Exercise

Patients who show moderate to severe distress are typically referred to appropriate resources, such as a clinical health psychologist, social worker, chaplain, or psychiatrist.

To answer the first question asked at the beginning of this article, after analyzing the facts. It can be concluded that to date, there is no convincing scientific evidence that links a person’s “attitude” to his or her risk of developing or dying from cancer. If you have cancer, it’s normal to feel sad, angry, or discouraged sometimes and positive or upbeat at other times. People with a positive attitude may be more likely to maintain social connections and stay active,and physical activity and emotional support may help you cope with your cancer.

Dr Reddy

vijayanandpreddy@gmail.com